Traditional Roman Catholic Church
(Latin Rite) 
Episcopal See
101  PLEASANT AVENUE, ABSECON, NEW JERSEY, USA
Telephone:1-609-641-5566/Fax: 609-641-1419 
E-mail: Chancery@trccepsnj.comcastbiz.net

The High Altar at the Cathedral in Green for the Season of Pentecost
The Month of August in Honor of The Immaculate Heart of Mary

Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary



The nature of the devotion


Just as devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus is only a form of devotion to the adorable Person of Jesus, so also is devotion to theHoly Heart of Mary but a special form of devotion to Mary. In order that, properly speaking, there may be devotion to the Heart ofMary, the attention and the homage of the faithful must be directed to the physical heart itself. However, this in itself is not sufficient; the faithful must read therein all that the human heart of Mary suggests, all of which it is the expressive symbol and the living reminder: Mary's interior life, her joys and sorrows, her virtues and hidden perfections, and, above all, her virginal love for her God, her maternal love for her Divine Son, and her motherly and compassionate love for her sinful and miserable children here below. The consideration of Mary's interior life and the beauties of her soul, without any thought of her physical heart, does not constitute ourdevotion; still less does it consist in the consideration of the Heart of Mary merely as a part of her virginal body. The two elements areessential to the devotion, just as soul and body are necessary to the constitution of man.

All this is made sufficiently clear in the explanations given elsewhere (see DEVOTION TO THE HEART OF JESUS), and, if our devotion to Mary must not be confounded with our devotion to Jesus, on the other hand, it is equally true that our veneration of the Heart ofMary is, as such, analogous to our worship of the Heart of Jesus. It is, however, necessary to indicate a few differences in thisanalogy, the better to explain the character of Catholic devotion to the Heart of Mary. Some of these differences are very marked, whereas others are barely perceptible. Devotion to the Heart of Jesus is especially directed to the Divine Heart as overflowing withlove for men, and it presents this love to us as despised and outraged. In the devotion to the Heart of Mary, on the other hand, what seems to attract us above all else is the love of this Heart for Jesus and for God. Its love for men is not overlooked, but it is not so much in evidence nor so dominant. With this difference is linked another. The first, act of the devotion to the Heart of Jesus is the loveeager to respond to love, in devotion to the Heart of Mary there is no first act so clearly indicated: in this devotion, perhaps, study and imitation hold as important a place as love. For, although this study and imitation are impregnated with filial affection, thedevotion presents itself with no object sufficiently conspicuous to call forth our love, which is, on the contrary, naturally awakened and increased by the study and imitation. Hence, accurately speaking, love is more the result than the object of the devotion, the object being rather to love God, and Jesus better by uniting ourselves to Mary for this purpose and by imitating her virtues. It would also seem that, although in the devotion to the Heart of Mary the heart has an essential part as symbol and sensible object, it does not stand out as prominently as in the devotion to the Heart of Jesus; we think rather of the thing symbolized, of love, virtues, and sentiments, of Mary's interior life.


The history of the devotion


The history of the devotion to the Heart of Mary is connected on many points with that to the Heart of Jesus; nevertheless, it has its own history which, although very simple, is not devoid of interest. The attention of Christians was early attracted by the love andvirtues of the Heart of Mary. The Gospel itself invited this attention with exquisite discretion and delicacy. What was first excited was compassion for the Virgin Mother. It was, so to speak, at the foot of the Cross that the Christian heart first made the acquaintance of the Heart of Mary. Simeon's prophecy paved the way and furnished the devotion with one of its favourite formulae and most popular representations: the heart pierced with a sword. But Mary was not merely passive at the foot of the Cross; "she cooperated throughcharity", as St. Augustine says, "in the work of our redemption".

Another Scriptural passage to help in bringing out the devotion was the twice-repeated saying of St. Luke, that Mary kept all the sayings and doings of Jesus in her heart, that there she might ponder over them and live by them. A few of the Virgin's sayings, also recorded in the Gospel, particularly the Magnificat, disclose new features in Marian psychology. Some of the Fathers also throw light upon the psychology of the Virgin, for instance, St. Ambrose, when in his commentary on St. Luke he holds Mary up as the ideal ofvirginity, and St. Ephrem, when he so poetically sings of the coming of the Magi and the welcome accorded them by the humbleMother. Little by little, in consequence of the application of the Canticle of the loving relations between God and the Blessed Virgin, the Heart of Mary came to be for the Christian Church the Heart of the Spouse of the Canticles as well as the Heart of the VirginMother. Some passages from other Sapiential Books, likewise understood as referring to Mary, in whom they personify wisdom and her gentle charms, strengthened this impression. Such are the texts in which wisdom is presented as the mother lofty love, of fear, ofknowledge, and of holy hope. In the New Testament Elizabeth proclaims Mary blessed because she has believed the words of theangel; the Magnificat is an expression of her humility; and in answering the woman of the people, who in order to exalt the Sonproclaimed the Mother blessed, did not Jesus himself say: "Blessed rather are they that hear the word of God and keep it", thus in a manner inviting us to seek in Mary that which had so endeared her to God and caused her to be selected as the Mother of Jesus? TheFathers understood His meaning, and found in these words a new reason for praising Mary. St. Leo says that through faith and loveshe conceived her Son spiritually, even before receiving Him into her womb, and St. Augustine tells us that she was more blessed in having borne Christ in her heart than in having conceived Him in the flesh.

It is only in the twelfth, or towards the end of the eleventh century, that slight indications of a regular devotion are perceived in asermon by St. Bernard (De duodecim stellis), from which an extract has been taken by the Church and used in the Offices of theCompassion and of the Seven Dolours. Stronger evidences are discernible in the pious meditations on the Ave Maria and the Salve Regina, usually attributed either to St. Anselm of Lucca (d. 1080) or St. Bernard; and also in the large book "De laudibus B. Mariae Virginis" (Douai, 1625) by Richard de Saint-Laurent. Penitentiary of Rouen in the thirteenth century. In St. Mechtilde (d. 1298) andSt. Gertrude (d. 1302) the devotion had two earnest adherents. A little earlier it had been included by St. Thomas Becket in thedevotion to the joys and sorrows of Mary, by Blessed Hermann (d. 1245), one of the first spiritual children of St. Dominic, in his otherdevotions to Mary, and somewhat later it appeared in St. Bridget's "Book of Revelations". Tauler (d. 1361) beholds in Mary the model of a mystical, just as St. Ambrose perceived in her the model of a virginal soulSt. Bernardine of Siena (d. 1444) was more absorbed in the contemplation of the virginal heart, and it is from him that the Church has borrowed the lessons of the Second Nocturn for thefeast of the Heart of Mary. St. Francis de Sales speaks of the perfections of this heart, the model of love for God, and dedicated to it his "Theotimus".

During this same period one finds occasional mention of devotional practices to the Heart of Mary, e.g. in the "Antidotarium" ofNicolas du Saussay (d. 1488), in Julius II, and in the "Pharetra" of Lanspergius. In the second half of the sixteenth century and the first half of the seventeenth, ascetic authors dwelt upon this devotion at greater length. It was, however, reserved to St. Jean Eudes(d. 1681) to propagate the devotion, to make it public, and to have a feast celebrated in honor of the Heart of Mary, first at Autun in 1648 and afterwards in a number of French dioceses. He established several religious societies interested in upholding and promoting the devotion, of which his large book on the Coeur Admirable (Admirable Heart), published in 1681, resembles a summary. Père Eudes' efforts to secure the approval of an Office and feast failed at Rome, but, notwithstanding, this disappointment, the devotion to the Heart of Mary progressed. In 1699 Father Pinamonti (d. 1703) published in Italian his beautiful little work on the Holy Heart ofMary, and in 1725 Père de Gallifet combined the cause of the Heart of Mary with that of the Heart of Jesus in order to obtain Rome'sapprobation of the two devotions and the institution of the two feasts. In 1729 his project was defeated, and in 1765 the two causeswere separated, to assure the success of the principal one.

In 1799 Pius VI, then in captivity at Florence, granted the Bishop of Palermo the feast of the Most Pure Heart of Mary for some of thechurches in his diocese. In 1805 Pius VII made a new concession, thanks to which the feast was soon widely observed. Such was the existing condition when a twofold movement, started in Paris, gave fresh impetus to the devotion. The two factors of this movement were first of all the revelation of the "miraculous medal" in 1830 and all the prodigies that followed, and then the establishment atNotre-Dame-des-Victoires of the Archconfraternity of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Refuge of Sinners, which spread rapidly throughout the world and was the source of numberless graces. On 21 July, 1855, the Congregation of Rites finally approved theOffice and Mass of the Most Pure Heart of Mary without, however, imposing them upon the Universal Church.

Now there are at least three feasts of the Heart of Mary, all with different Offices:

  • that of Rome, observed in many places on the Sunday after the Octave of the Assumption and in others on the third Sundayafter Pentecost or in the beginning of July;
  • that of Pere Eudes celebrated among the Eudists and in a number of communities on 8 February; and
  • that of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, solemnized a little before Lent.
However, no feast has as yet been granted to the entire Church.
The history of the devotion to the Heart of Mary is connected on many points with that to the Heart of Jesus; nevertheless, it has its own history which, although very simple, is not devoid of interest. The attention of Christians was early attracted by the love and virtues of the Heart of Mary. The Gospel itself invited this attention with exquisite discretion and delicacy. What was first excited was compassion for the Virgin Mother. It was, so to speak, at the foot of the Cross that the Christian heart first made the acquaintance of the Heart of Mary. Simeon's prophecy paved the way and furnished the devotion with one of its favourite formulae and most popular representations: the heart pierced with a sword. But Mary was not merely passive at the foot of the Cross; "she cooperated through charity", as St. Augustine says, "in the work of our redemption".
Another Scriptural passage to help in bringing out the devotion was the twice-repeated saying of St. Luke, that Mary kept all the sayings and doings of Jesus in her heart, that there she might ponder over them and live by them. A few of the Virgin's sayings, also recorded in the Gospel, particularly the Magnificat, disclose new features in Marian psychology. Some of the Fathers also throw light upon the psychology of the Virgin, for instance, St. Ambrose, when in his commentary on St. Luke he holds Mary up as the ideal of virginity, and St. Ephrem, when he so poetically sings of the coming of the Magi and the welcome accorded them by the humble Mother. Little by little, in consequence of the application of the Canticle of the loving relations between God and the Blessed Virgin, the Heart of Mary came to be for the Christian Church the Heart of the Spouse of the Canticles as well as the Heart of the Virgin Mother. Some passages from other Sapiential Books, likewise understood as referring to Mary, in whom they personify wisdom and her gentle charms, strengthened this impression. Such are the texts in which wisdom is presented as the mother lofty love, of fear, of knowledge, and of holy hope. In the New Testament Elizabeth proclaims Mary blessed because she has believed the words of the angel; the Magnificat is an expression of her humility; and in answering the woman of the people, who in order to exalt the Son proclaimed the Mother blessed, did not Jesus himself say: "Blessed rather are they that hear the word of God and keep it", thus in a manner inviting us to seek in Mary that which had so endeared her to God and caused her to be selected as the Mother of Jesus? The Fathers understood His meaning, and found in these words a new reason for praising Mary. St. Leo says that through faith and love she conceived her Son spiritually, even before receiving Him into her womb, and St. Augustine tells us that she was more blessed in having borne Christ in her heart than in having conceived Him in the flesh.
It is only in the twelfth, or towards the end of the eleventh century, that slight indications of a regular devotion are perceived in a sermon by St. Bernard (De duodecim stellis), from which an extract has been taken by the Church and used in the Offices of the Compassion and of the Seven Dolours. Stronger evidences are discernible in the pious meditations on the Ave Maria and the Salve Regina, usually attributed either to St. Anselm of Lucca (d. 1080) or St. Bernard; and also in the large book "De laudibus B. Mariae Virginis" (Douai, 1625) by Richard de Saint-Laurent. Penitentiary of Rouen in the thirteenth century. In St. Mechtilde (d. 1298) and St. Gertrude (d. 1302) the devotion had two earnest adherents. A little earlier it had been included by St. Thomas Becket in the devotion to the joys and sorrows of Mary, by Blessed Hermann (d. 1245), one of the first spiritual children of St. Dominic, in his other devotions to Mary, and somewhat later it appeared in St. Bridget's "Book of Revelations". Tauler (d. 1361) beholds in Mary the model of a mystical, just as St. Ambrose perceived in her the model of a virginal soul. St. Bernardine of Siena (d. 1444) was more absorbed in the contemplation of the virginal heart, and it is from him that the Church has borrowed the lessons of the Second Nocturn for the feast of the Heart of Mary. St. Francis de Sales speaks of the perfections of this heart, the model of love for God, and dedicated to it his "Theotimus".
During this same period one finds occasional mention of devotional practices to the Heart of Mary, e.g. in the "Antidotarium" of Nicolas du Saussay (d. 1488), in Julius II, and in the "Pharetra" of Lanspergius. In the second half of the sixteenth century and the first half of the seventeenth, ascetic authors dwelt upon this devotion at greater length. It was, however, reserved to St. Jean Eudes (d. 1681) to propagate the devotion, to make it public, and to have a feast celebrated in honor of the Heart of Mary, first at Autun in 1648 and afterwards in a number of French dioceses. He established several religious societies interested in upholding and promoting the devotion, of which his large book on the Coeur Admirable (Admirable Heart), published in 1681, resembles a summary. Père Eudes' efforts to secure the approval of an Office and feast failed at Rome, but, notwithstanding, this disappointment, the devotion to the Heart of Mary progressed. In 1699 Father Pinamonti (d. 1703) published in Italian his beautiful little work on the Holy Heart of Mary, and in 1725 Père de Gallifet combined the cause of the Heart of Mary with that of the Heart of Jesus in order to obtain Rome's approbation of the two devotions and the institution of the two feasts. In 1729 his project was defeated, and in 1765 the two causes were separated, to assure the success of the principal one.
In 1799 Pius VI, then in captivity at Florence, granted the Bishop of Palermo the feast of the Most Pure Heart of Mary for some of the churches in his diocese. In 1805 Pius VII made a new concession, thanks to which the feast was soon widely observed. Such was the existing condition when a twofold movement, started in Paris, gave fresh impetus to the devotion. The two factors of this movement were first of all the revelation of the "miraculous medal" in 1830 and all the prodigies that followed, and then the establishment at Notre-Dame-des-Victoires of the Archconfraternity of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Refuge of Sinners, which spread rapidly throughout the world and was the source of numberless graces. On 21 July, 1855, the Congregation of Rites finally approved the Office and Mass of the Most Pure Heart of Mary without, however, imposing them upon the Universal Church.
Now there are at least three feasts of the Heart of Mary, all with different Offices:
that of Rome, observed in many places on the Sunday after the Octave of the Assumption and in others on the third Sunday after Pentecost or in the beginning of July;
that of Pere Eudes celebrated among the Eudists and in a number of communities on 8 February; and
that of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, solemnized a little before Lent.
However, no feast has as yet been granted to the entire Church.

What's happening on The trcatholics website
  . Liturgical Calendar for the month of August 
  . Check out our mission Church in the Congo
(By clicking on the link here)
. Check out our new Cathedral of Ss. Peter & Paul website by clicking on the Links
and the American Flag
. Also look at our Capital Campaign link and please leave a donation
.Check out our 
live feed of Masses Weekly Mass with the Bishop Series 
by clicking on link below

The Cathedral of Ss. Peter
.Please check out our new Seafood Fest link and purchase tickets via of our online form
by (clicking link Here)
.Check out our new informative video on the errors of the Vatican II and The Mass
by clicking on the link
(here)

Cathedral's Daily Schedule

Weekday Low Mass: 11:15 A.M.

Sunday Mass: 10:00 A.M.

Wednesday Low Mass with Devotions: 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

Sunday Confessions: 9:00 - 10:00 A.M.

Saturday Confessions: 4:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.


His Grace
Bishop Sherman R. John Pius Mosley is a member
of
The American Association of Christian Counselors

Terrorism Hits America... Again!

Americans awakened on June 12, 2016 to horrific headlines: a gunman with apparent ties to radical Islam/Isis murdered 50 Americans and wounded more than 50 others in cold blood in Orlando, Florida. Not only was this vicious terrorist attack perpetrated on our own soil, it was done at the beginning of our summer vacation period in the most popular destination in the country for tourism and family entertainment. To date, this unconscionable act of violence constitutes the largest single mass murder in United States history.

Obviously the nefarious goals of these radical, violent attacks include inflicting widespread terror, trauma, and tragedy. While many of these terrorist attacks have occurred over the past few years around the world, and increasingly during the month of Ramadan (June 5th to July 5th), this kind of enormous death toll carried out on U.S. soil literally brings the war on terror home in a devastating and diabolic way.

It is easy to feel overwhelmed with fear and/or outrage in the face of this latest example of terrorism. Some will attempt to cope by politicizing or pigeonholing the perpetrator and/or the targeted victims in various ways. Yet, none of that posturing or pontificating makes us any more safe or secure. The simple truth is that these kinds of attacks make us all acutely aware of our fundamental human vulnerabilities and a generalized lack of safety for us and our loved ones in a fallen world where evil and wickedness often run rampant.

From General Psych 101, we all know that safety ranks near the top of the hierarchy of human needs. Thus, when safety needs are threatened in a way previously unprecedented to our collective life experience, they are substantive. These attacks can take place just as easily in any large gathering of people and to any targeted or random population: churches (as we have already seen), sporting events, concerts, amusement parks, state fairgrounds, or numerous other public experiences. Perhaps never before in our nation’s history are we so anxious to look over our proverbial shoulders for a sudden act of violence.

How, then, shall we as Christian counselors respond? For starters, we must—as in all things—respond with faith, not in fear (see Psalm 46, 91, etc.). Although our circumstances can be, and often are, very fearful, we know our faith is not contingent on things we can see, grasp or control (Hebrews 11). God is in control. He is sovereign; we are creatures. And as with any other figurative or literal muscle, faith is strengthened when it is exercised. Here are five ways we suggest you exercise your faith in such a crisis as this:

  1. Talking – We know that our anxieties diminish as we talk out our feelings to God and trusted others rather than act them out (1 Peter 5:7). Encourage your clients and congregants to pray for those affected, organize and participate in support groups, and share with, and pray for, one another.
  2. Touching – We know that holding and hugging reduces stress hormones and creates a sense of comfort, especially when we experience grief, loss and hurt (Romans 16:16). Literal and figurative meaningful and appropriate touches help us connect and support one another in our humanness.
  3. Togetherness – We know that compassionately connecting and communing with others provide support and represent caring and concern (Hebrews 10:25). Reaching out in meaningful and personal ways ministers powerfully to hurting souls.
  4. Teaching – We know that education always empowers, encourages, and equips the learner (2 Thessalonians 2:15). Skill acquisition produces self-confidence and greater ministry potentials. Training people how to lead grief groups, deal with trauma, and help parents learn to healthfully address their children’s fears will be a great service to your community.
  5. Tasking – We know that all hard work yields a profit (Proverbs 14:23). Coordinating various churches, ministries, and organizations, as well as mobilizing community resources, can be challenging, but rewarding, work that will assist in bringing people help, healing, and hope.


The American Association of Christian Counselors is hard at work to help people, ministries, and churches in the greater Orlando area cope with, and recover from, this horrible tragedy. Pray and stand with us as we strive to minister to those who are grief-stricken in the Orlando community. When societal deterioration and darkness increase, our salt and light become all the more necessary and noticeable.


 


AACC is committed to assisting Christian counselors, the entire 'community of care,' licensed professionals, pastors, and lay church members. Our goal is to equip clinical, pastoral, and lay caregivers with biblical truth and psychosocial insights that minister to hurting people and help them move to personal wholeness, interpersonal competence, mental stability, and spiritual maturity.

P.O. Box 739 Forest, VA 24551 800.526.8673
You received this message because you are subscribed to an AACC.net e-mail list.
Change your subscription settings here

UNSUBSCRIBE     UPDATE INFO

 

TOWEL DRIVE

The Cathedral of Ss. Peter and Paul

Roman Catholic Church

Traditional Latin Rite


TOWEL DRIVE

Your Contributions will Benefit Our Missions and Parishes in

Cameroon and the Philippines

Colors:  Blue, Green & Gray Only (No White please!)

 

Contributions of Towels can be brought in to the Church Tuesday to Sunday during the Months of June & July, 2016

 

Sponsored by The Oblates of St. Benedict

 

For Information, Please Contact Sr. Violet Lamb, Obl/OSB

At 609 641-5566

609 277-6456 


                                                                        

With great joy we announce the purchase of our new edifice in
Williamstown New Jersey
To see more go to the new Cathedral link and click on the Capital Campaign  link to see PowerPoint and online form for donations  
 What We Believe

The "Professio fidei Tridentina", also known as the "Creed of Pope Pius IV", is one of the four authoritative Creeds of the Catholic Church. It was issued on November 13, 1565 by Pope Pius IV in his bull "Iniunctum nobis" under the auspices of the Council of Trent (1545 - 1563). It was subsequently modified slightly after the First Vatican Council (1869 - 1870) to bring it inline with the dogmatic definitions of the Council. The major intent of the Creed was to clearly define the Catholic faith against Protestantism. At one time it was used by Theologians as an oath of loyalty to the Church and to reconcile converts to the Church, but it is rarely used these days. We do not accept the teachings and beliefs of the Old Roman Catholic Church thus we are not Old Catholic, we are The Traditional Roman Catholic Church, we believe and profess what Our Lord taught and the Apostles believed, based on the three pillars of the Church. Sacred Tradition, Sacred Scripture, and the  
Magisterium. Unlike many Traditionalist groups we do not engaged in debates, or arguments concerning Validity of Orders. Such arguments cause further wounds to the body of Christ and are not conducive to the practice of the true religion.

Thus this is what we believe and profess:

I, N, with a firm faith believe and profess each and everything which is contained in the Creed which the Holy Roman Church maketh use of. To wit:

I believe in one God, The Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible. And in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the Only-begotten Son of God. Born of the Father before all ages. God of God, Light of Light, true God of true God. Begotten, not made, of one substance with the Father. By whom all things were made. Who for us men and for our salvation came down from heaven. And became incarnate by the Holy Spirit of the Virgin Mary: and was made man. He was also crucified for us, suffered under Pontius Pilate, and was buried. And on the third day He rose again according to the Scriptures. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of the Father. He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead and His kingdom will have no end. And in the Holy Spirit, the Lord and Giver of life, Who proceeds from the Father and the Son. Who together with the Father and the Son is adored and glorified, and who spoke through the prophets. And one holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. I confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins and I await the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come. Amen. 

The Apostolic and Ecclesiastical traditions and all other observances and constitutions of that same Church I firmly admit to and embrace.

I also accept the Holy Scripture according to that sense which holy mother the Church hath held, and doth hold, and to whom it belongeth to judge the true sense and interpretations of the Scriptures. Neither will I ever take and interpret them otherwise than according to the unanimous consent of the Fathers. 
I also profess that there are truly and properly Seven Sacraments of the New Law, instituted by Jesus Christ our Lord, and necessary for the salvation of mankind, though not all are necessary for everyone; to wit, Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Penance, Extreme Unction, Holy Orders, and Matrimony; and that they confer grace; and that of these, Baptism, Confirmation, and Holy Orders cannot be repeated without sacrilege. I also receive and admit the accepted and approved ceremonies of the Catholic Church in the solemn administration of the aforesaid sacraments. 

I embrace and accept each and everything which has been defined and declared in the holy Council of Trent concerning original sin and justification. 

I profess, likewise, that in the Mass there is offered to God a true, proper, and propitiatory sacrifice for the living and the dead; and that in the most holy sacrament of the Eucharist there is truly, really, and substantially, the Body and Blood, together with the soul and divinity, of our Lord Jesus Christ; and that a conversion takes place of the whole substance of the bread into the Body, and of the whole substance of the wine into the Blood, which conversion the Catholic Church calls Transubstantiation. I also confess that under either species alone Christ is received whole and entire, and a true sacrament. 

I steadfastly hold that there is a Purgatory, and that the souls therein detained are helped by the suffrages of the faithful. Likewise, that the saints, reigning together with Christ, are to be honored and invoked, and that they offer prayers to God for us, and that their relics are to be venerated. I most firmly assert that the images of Christ, of the Mother of God, ever virgin, and also of other Saints, ought to be kept and retained, and that due honor and veneration is to be given them. 

I also affirm that the power of indulgences was left by Christ in the Church, and that the use of them is most wholesome to Christian people. 

I acknowledge the Holy Catholic Apostolic Roman Church as the mother and teacher of all churches; and I promise true obedience to the Bishop of Rome, successor to St. Peter, Prince of the Apostles, and Vicar of Jesus Christ. 

I likewise undoubtedly receive and profess all other things delivered, defined, and declared by the sacred Canons, and general Councils, and particularly by the holy Council of Trent, and by the ecumenical Council of the Vatican, particularly concerning the primacy of the Roman Pontiff and his infallible teaching. I condemn, reject, and anathematize all things contrary thereto, and all heresies which the Church hath condemned, rejected, and anathematized. 
This true Catholic faith, outside of which no one can be saved, which I now freely profess and to which I truly adhere, I do so profess and swear to maintain inviolate and with firm constancy with the help of God until the last breath of life. And I shall strive, as far as possible, that this same faith shall be held, taught, and professed by all those over whom I have charge. I N. do so pledge, promise, and swear, so help me God and these Holy Gospels of God.

This is what believe and this is what we profess so help us God
Amen.

A Quote from St. Athanasius
The Traditional Roman Catholic Church is a body of Christians committed to the Person of Jesus Christ and His teachings. We are a historical part of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.

 

     We are a Traditional Catholic Church, defending the Sacred Traditions as passed on  by the Apostles, the Church Fathers, and the Councils, prior to Vatican II.

      We welcome you to become a part of our tradition. We are committed to loving parishes, missions, and chapels throughout the world as guided by the Holy Ghost. We are also committed to training and forming men to be sacred priests.


     St. Athanasius says, "
May God console you! ... What saddens you ... is the fact that others have occupied the churches by violence, while during this time you are on the outside. It is a fact that they have the premises – but you have the Apostolic Faith. They can occupy our churches, but they are outside the true Faith. You remain outside the places of worship, but the Faith dwells within you. Let us consider: what is more important, the place or the Faith? The true Faith, obviously. Who has lost and who has won in the struggle – the one who keeps the premises or the one who keeps the Faith? True, the premises are good when the Apostolic Faith is preached there; they are holy if everything takes place there in a holy way ...

     "You are the ones who are happy; you who remain within the Church by your Faith, who hold firmly to the foundations of the Faith which has come down to you from Apostolic Tradition. And if an execrable jealousy has tried to shake it on a number of occasions, it has not succeeded. They are the ones who have broken away from it in the present crisis. No one, ever, will prevail against your Faith, beloved Brothers. And we believe that God will give us our churches back some day.


     "Thus, the more violently they try to occupy the places of worship, the more they separate themselves from the Church. They claim that they represent the Church; but in reality, they are the ones who are expelling themselves from it and going astray. Even if Catholics faithful to Tradition are reduced to a handful, they are the ones who are the true Church of Jesus Christ."


(Letter of St. Athanasius to his Flock)

A Quote from St. Augustine
And on this point the reader may benefit from the judgment of Saint Augustine:  “Often, too, divine providence permits even good men to be driven from the congregation of Christ by the turbulent seditions of carnal men.  When for the sake of the peace of the Church they patiently endure that insult or injury, and attempt no novelties in the way of heresy or schism, they will teach men how God is to be served with a true disposition and with great and sincere charity.  The intention of such men is to return when the tumult has subsided.  But if that is not permitted because the storm continues or because a fiercer one might be stirred up by their return, they hold fast to their purpose to look to the good even of those responsible for the tumults and commotions that drove them out.  They form no separate conventicles of their own, but defend to the death and assist by their testimony the faith which they know is preached in the Catholic Church.  These the Father who seeth in secret crowns secretly.  It appears that this is a rare kind of Christian, but examples are not lacking.  Indeed, there are more than can be believed.  So divine providence uses all kinds of men as examples for the oversight of souls and for the building up of his spiritual people.” 

(De vera religione, in Augustine: Earlier Writings, translated by John H. S. Burleigh [Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1953], 231.)

De Publicatione Festorum Mobilium

2016

In Epiphania Domini 


TRADITIONAL ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 

DECREE 

OF 

SOLEMN ANNOUNCEMENT

OF 

MOVABLE FEASTDAYS

                            ON EPIPHANY 


TRCC JAN 06 DECREE
January 6, 2016 

Know ye, beloved brethren, that as by God's favor we rejoiced in the Nativity of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, so, too, we announce to you the glad tidings on the Resurrection of 
our Savior


The Sunday of Septuagesima will fall on January 24, 2016, Ash Wednesday and the 
beginning of the most holy Lenten fast on February 10, 2016. On March 27, 2016, you 
shall celebrate with greatest joy the holy Pasch (Easter) of our Lord's Resurrection. 


The Ascension of our Lord, Jesus Christ will occur on May 5, 2016, The Feast of 
Pentecost on May 15, 2016. The Feast of Corpus Christi on May 26, 2016. 


November 27th, 2016, will usher in the Advent of our Lord, Jesus Christ, to Whom be 
glory and honor eternally 


                         
        His Grace 

                     + Shermanus Randallus Pius Moslei, D.D., 

                                       Bishop 



Click on link below for Latin Publication of Moveable Feasts 
This Website is Dedicated to Our Lady
Sign Guestbook
View Guestbook

To our visitors, kindly sign our Guestbook (below). Let us know what you think, your questions or even your reflections. Please suggest how we can improve our website. 

Your comments are greatly appreciated.

- The Administrator