Saint of The Day

 Happy Holidays 

 

The Month of December 

 

 Monday December 11th

Feast of St. Damasus 1st (Pope and Confessor)

Damasus was a Spaniard of great eminence and learned in the Sacred Scriptures. He called the first Council of Constantinople, in which he abolished the evil heresy of Eunomius and Macedonius. He repeated the condemnation, already pronounced by Liberius, of the Council of Rimini. A proclamation of that council, chiefly due, as writeth St. Jerome, to the intrigues of Valens and Ursacius, had condemned the faith of Nicea. Damasus built two basilicas: one dedicated to St. Lawrence near the theatre of Pompey, the other on the Ardeatine Way at the Catacombs. He decreed that, as was already the custom in many places, Psalms should be sung day and night in all churches by alternate choirs, and that at the end of each Psalm should be repeated the words: "Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost." It was at his command that St. Jerome revised the translation of the New Testament to make it faithful to the Greek text. He discovered many bodies of holy Martyrs and celebrated their memory in verses. When he was nearly eighty years old and famous for his virtue, learning and prudence, he fell asleep in the Lord, during the reign of Theodosius the Great.

 

Tuesday December, 12th

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

 

In Mexico, on the hill of Tepeyac, in the year 1531, the God-bearing Virgin Mary, as is piously handed down, appeared to the neophyte Juan Diego, and gave him a command for Bishop Juan de Zumarraga, which she urgently repeated, that a church was to be constructed in her name at that location. The bishop, however, requested a sign. Then, while he was seeking the sacraments for his dying uncle far from the place of the apparition, his loving Mother favored the neophyte with a third vision, assured him of his uncle's health, and after he had gathered roses into his cloak that had blossomed out of season, she ordered him to take them to the bishop. The roses having spilled out in the sight of the bishop, an image of Mary, impressed upon the cloak itself, according to the tradition, appeared to those present in a wondrous manner. At first kept in the bishop's chapel, then transferred to a shrine constructed on the hill of Tepeyac, it was finally moved to a magnificent temple, to which Mexicans increasingly began to gather in droves, for reasons of veneration and frequency of miracles. And therefore as an ever-present defense, the Mexican bishops, to the applause of the whole people, chose the blessed Virgin Mary of Guadalupe as the first Patroness of the Mexican people, which was duly confirmed by the apostolic authority of Benedict XIV. Leo XIII adorned the sacred image with a golden crown on Columbus Day, 1895, by the agency of the archbishop of Mexico. And St. Pius X declared the blessed Guadalupan Virgin as the Patroness of all Latin America. 

 

Wednesday December, 13th

Feast of St. Lucy (Virgin and Martyr)

 

 

Lucy, a virgin of Syracuse, noble by birth and by her Christian faith, went to the tomb of St. Agatha at Catheria and obtained the cure of her mother, Eutychia, who was suffering from a hemorrhage. Soon after, she gained her mother's permission to distribute to the poor all the possessions which were to have served as her dowry. As a result of this charitable action, she was accused of being a Christian and brought before Paschasius the Prefect. When neither promises nor threats could induce her to sacrifice the idols, Paschasius became enraged and commanded Lucy to be taken to a place where her virginity would be violated. But the power of God gave the virgin a strength that matched the firmness of her resolution, so that no force could move her where she stood. And so the prefect commanded a fire to be kindled all around here, but the flames did not harm her. After she had suffered many torments, therefore her throat was pierced through with a sword. So wounded she foretold that the Church would have peace after the deaths of Diocletian and Maximilian, and on December 13 she gave up her spirit to God. Her body was first buried at Syracuse, than taken to Constantinople, and finally transferred to Venice.

 

Thursday December, 14th

Feria Day

 

 

Psalm 68(14-29) [8]
68:14 In the multitude of thy mercy hear me, * in the truth of thy salvation.
68:15 Draw me out of the mire, that I may not stick fast: * deliver me from them that hate me, and out of the deep waters.
68:16 Let not the tempest of water drown me, nor the deep swallow me up: * and let not the pit shut her mouth upon me.
68:17 Hear me, O Lord, for thy mercy is kind; * look upon me according to the multitude of thy tender mercies.
68:18 And turn not away thy face from thy servant: * for I am in trouble, hear me speedily.
68:19 Attend to my soul, and deliver it: * save me because of my enemies.
68:20 Thou knowest my reproach, and my confusion, * and my shame.
68:21 In thy sight are all they that afflict me; * my heart hath expected reproach and misery.
68:22 And I looked for one that would grieve together with me, * but there was none: and for one that would comfort me, and I found none.
68:23 And they gave me gall for my food, * and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.
68:24 Let their table become as a snare before them, * and a recompense, and a stumblingblock.
68:25 Let their eyes be darkened that they see not; * and their back bend thou down always.
68:26 Pour out thy indignation upon them: * and let thy wrathful anger take hold of them.
68:27 Let their habitation be made desolate: * and let there be none to dwell in their tabernacles.
68:28 Because they have persecuted him whom thou hast smitten; * and they have added to the grief of my wounds.
68:29 Add thou iniquity upon their iniquity: * and let them not come into thy justice.
68:29 Let them be blotted out of the book of the living; * and with the just let them not be written.

 

Friday December 15th

Feria Day 

 

 

Psalm 68(14-29) [8]
68:14 In the multitude of thy mercy hear me, * in the truth of thy salvation.
68:15 Draw me out of the mire, that I may not stick fast: * deliver me from them that hate me, and out of the deep waters.
68:16 Let not the tempest of water drown me, nor the deep swallow me up: * and let not the pit shut her mouth upon me.
68:17 Hear me, O Lord, for thy mercy is kind; * look upon me according to the multitude of thy tender mercies.
68:18 And turn not away thy face from thy servant: * for I am in trouble, hear me speedily.
68:19 Attend to my soul, and deliver it: * save me because of my enemies.
68:20 Thou knowest my reproach, and my confusion, * and my shame.
68:21 In thy sight are all they that afflict me; * my heart hath expected reproach and misery.
68:22 And I looked for one that would grieve together with me, * but there was none: and for one that would comfort me, and I found none.
68:23 And they gave me gall for my food, * and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.
68:24 Let their table become as a snare before them, * and a recompense, and a stumblingblock.
68:25 Let their eyes be darkened that they see not; * and their back bend thou down always.
68:26 Pour out thy indignation upon them: * and let thy wrathful anger take hold of them.
68:27 Let their habitation be made desolate: * and let there be none to dwell in their tabernacles.
68:28 Because they have persecuted him whom thou hast smitten; * and they have added to the grief of my wounds.
68:29 Add thou iniquity upon their iniquity: * and let them not come into thy justice.
68:29 Let them be blotted out of the book of the living; * and with the just let them not be written.

 

Saturday December, 16th

Feast of St. Eusebius (Bishop and Martyr)

 

 

Eusebius was born in Sardinia a lector at Rome, and later bishop of Vercelli, fought so bravely against Arianism that his unconquerable faith supplied encouragement and new life to the Pope. Because of his profession of the Catholic faith, Eusebius was sent to Scythopolis by emperor Constantius, where he suffered hunger, thirst, beatings and many other kinds of torment. From there he was sent away to Cappadocia and endured hardships of exile until Constantius' death. When he was allowed to return to his own Church, Italy put off her garments of mourning. Here he published his own expurgated Latin translation of the Greek commentaries of Origen and those of Eusebius of Cesarea on all the psalms. At Vercelli, during the reign of Valentinian and Valens, he went to the Lord to receive the unfading crown of glory earned by his great labors and hardship.

 

Sunday December, 17th

Gaudete Sunday

 

 

Psalm 9(12-21) [6]
9:12 Sing ye to the Lord, who dwelleth in Sion: * declare his ways among the Gentiles.
9:13 For requiring their blood he hath remembered them: * he hath not forgotten the cry of the poor.
9:14 Have mercy on me, O Lord: * see my humiliation which I suffer from my enemies.
9:15 Thou that liftest me up from the gates of death, * that I may declare all thy praises in the gates of the daughter of Sion.
9:16 I will rejoice in thy salvation: * the Gentiles have stuck fast in the destruction which they have prepared.
9:16 Their foot hath been taken * in the very snare which they hid.
9:17 The Lord shall be known when he executeth judgments: * the sinner hath been caught in the works of his own hands.
9:18 The wicked shall be turned into hell, * all the nations that forget God.
9:19 For the poor man shall not be forgotten to the end: * the patience of the poor shall not perish for ever.
9:20 Arise, O Lord, let not man be strengthened: * let the Gentiles be judged in thy sight.
9:21 Appoint, O Lord, a lawgiver over them: * that the Gentiles may know themselves to be but men.